Materials

Sapphire

The name sapphire comes from the Hebrew sapphir, meaning “most beautiful,” and the Greek sappheiros, meaning “blue stone.” A member of the corundum family, the sapphire, together with the ruby, it is the second hardest stone after the diamond. Van Cleef & Arpels often chooses sapphires to embellish pieces using the Mystery Set™ technique, producing creations that exhibit a delicate velvety flair.

The sapphire’s extensive palette of colors ranges from deep blue to intense pink, and includes yellow, orange and green. Blue sapphires have always been the most prized for their rich and sumptuous hue: ultramarine, royal blue, sky blue, with nuances varying according to the stone’s origin. In the past, the most opulent stones were to be found in Cashmere. Today, the most renowned blue sapphires come from Madagascar, Sri Lanka (formerly Ceylon) and Burma.

The sapphire’s extensive palette of colors ranges from deep blue to intense pink, and includes yellow, orange and green.

The Maison selects sapphires with an ardent color, a brilliant glow and a pure essence.

To preserve sapphires’ color and intense luster, Van Cleef & Arpels recommends cleansing them with a soft brush and soapy water.

  • Setting work, adjusting the prongs, Innamorato bracelet, Van Cleef & Arpels

    Setting work, adjusting the prongs, Innamorato bracelet