Stones

Turquoise

Characterized by an intense blue color, turquoise is among the first stones to be mined during Antiquity. Collections such as Alhambra®, Perlée™ and Bouton d’or feature turquoise in delicate harmonies of color, set off by white or yellow gold. Turquoise’s azure hue also features in the Maison’s High Jewelry creations, where it figures beautifully side by side with precious stones.

  • Cabochon-cut turquoise shown on the gouaché design of the Paons clip, Van Cleef & Arpels

    Cabochon-cut turquoise shown on the gouaché design of the Paons clip

A symbol of prosperity, it was prized by Egyptian pharaohs and Aztecs alike.

Turquoise was introduced in Europe during the Renaissance: imported from Turkey, it came to be known as “Turkish stone.” A symbol of prosperity, it was prized by Egyptian pharaohs and Aztecs alike, who used it to embellish jewelry, religious artifacts and great seals. In Europe, turquoise is offered as a sign of devotion due to its color reminiscent of the forget-me-not, a flower representing love and remembrance.

For its creations, Van Cleef & Arpels selects turquoise from Central and South America for its perfectly consistent sky-blue tone. Owing to its nature and chemical composition, the color of turquoise stones may change over time or when exposed to acidity and heat.

To preclude such alterations, Van Cleef & Arpels purchases stones having undergone a stabilization process in their raw state to preserve their natural hue.
To protect this stone from damage or scratching, the Maison recommends storing turquoise pieces in a dry fabric-lined box separate from other jewelry.

  • Hard stones marquetry, Lady Arpels Martin-Pêcheur Azur watch, Van Cleef & Arpels

    Hard stones marquetry, Lady Arpels Martin-Pêcheur Azur watch