Nature

Van Cleef & Arpels’ bouquets

Nature is one of the Maison’s prime sources of inspiration, imbuing creations with vitality and poetic grace. From all-diamond clips created in the 1920s to contemporary jewelry pieces, floral motifs lie at the core of the Van Cleef & Arpels universe.

  • Van Cleef & Arpels advert designed by René-Sim Lacaze, 1927.  Van Cleef & Arpels Archives

    Van Cleef & Arpels advert designed by René-Sim Lacaze, 1927. Van Cleef & Arpels Archives

Enthralled by the constant metamorphoses that enliven the plant world, the Maison echoes the infinite forms and nuances of flora, crystallizing the lightness of a bouquet or the freshness of wildflowers. Amid a dazzling, eternal spring, poppies commune with daisies, while lilies of the valley mingle with cherry blossoms, all transformed into jewels by the Mains d’Or™ in the Place Vendôme workshops. Van Cleef & Arpels applies its iconic savoir-faire in various fields to bring exceptional creations to life: for instance, the expert Mystery Set™ technique, patented by the Maison in 1933, imparts a velvety quality to the Pivoine clip (1937), originally a double clip representing two ruby flowers, one in full bloom, while the other is half-closed.

Delicate petals, set with ornamental or precious stones, enhance the exquisite materials composing them. The 1970 Rose de Noël™ collection and the 1981 Cosmos collection, portray corollas in mother-of-pearl, coral and onyx. The Frivole collection, introduced in 2003, gleams with precious flowers in mirror-polished gold – a traditional jewelry-making technique that results in an intense interplay of light on the metal’s surface.

Delicate petals, set with hard or precious stones, enhance the exquisite materials composing them. The 1970 Rose de Noël™ collection and the 1981 Cosmos collection, portray corollas in mother-of-pearl, coral and onyx. The Frivole collection, introduced in 2003, gleams with precious flowers in mirror-polished gold – a traditional jewelry-making technique that results in an intense interplay of light on the metal’s surface.